Illustrators: Responding to the Text

 Julie Paschkis

 #1. What elements of a manuscript first capture your attention? Plot? Language? Imagery? Tone? Sound? Theme?

Language is the first thing that grabs me. But it is hard to pick out any one element; all of the elements work together to create a good story. I respond to a good story first as a reader. When I read something that I want to illustrate I feel a general excitement. I rarely envision specific imagery right away.

I read a text so many times and from so many angles as I am illustrating; I really grow to appreciate a well-written text more and more as I am working on a book.

In your wonderful book WHO PUT THE COOKIES IN THE COOKIE JAR? I responded to the rhythmic qualities of the language and also to the loving message. It felt right to illustrate it in a way that was influenced by the books of my childhood.

2. What elements of a manuscript inspire your choice of style, line, and palette?

For example, your illustrations in THROUGH GEORGIA’S EYES, HERE COMES GRANDMA, and MRS. CHICKEN AND THE HUNGRY CROCODILE are at once related, yet still different from one another.

Before I start drawing at all I let the manuscript percolate in the back of my mind for as long as I can. Gradually I get a sense of what I want the illustrations to look like. It is a combination of intuition and rational decision-making. I will also do research related to the text.

 When I illustrated THROUGH GEORGIA’S EYES I read her biography, looked at lots of her paintings, visited her home in Abiquiu and her museum in Santa Fe before starting any sketches. That was the rational part. But I was still stumped for how to approach it. In Santa Fe I went to the folk art museum and saw some Polish paper cuts and made the intuitive leap to illustrate that book as paper cuts. That way I could honor her paintings without trying to paint a Georgia O’Keeffe; translating the medium allowed me to use her imagery in a way that was still mine.

In HEAD BODY LEGS by Meg Lippert and Won-ldy Paye I wanted bright colors and simple shapes intuitively to echo the simple and funny story. Specifically I was inspired by Asafo Flags of West Africa as a way to approach the storytelling. I continued that style in MRS. CHICKEN and in THE TALKING VEGETABLES.

Asafo flag

HEAD BODY LEGS

In every book I want the pictures to amplify and echo the words. And I want to have fun painting it. I think I have succeeded if the reader can’t imagine the words and the pictures without each other. The words come first in my process.

3.  Is there a picture book text that you would love to re-illustrate? What about the text excites you toward doing this?

I would love to illustrate Peter and the Wolf. I did a poster for NW Sinfonietta a few years ago. I listened to the story and the music while I was working on it. I love them both so much. I would like to illustrate the whole piece.

4.  As an illustrator, what is it that you most want writers to understand about you creative process?

I want the author to write a great manuscript and trust me to bring my best to it. These are the things that make it fun for me to illustrate a manuscript:

*There are wonderful words.

*Something happens – it is easier to illustrate a story than a reverie.

*Not everything is spelled out; there are places for me to use my imagination.

*I think that the same qualities that make a book good to read make it good to illustrate.

THANK YOU, JULIE, for sharing your thoughts. To learn more about Julie, her illustrations, books, paintings, and fabric designs please visit her website:  <www.juliepaschkis.com>

Picture Books Referenced Above

HEAD, BODY, LEGS by Won-Idy Paye & Margaret Lippert, Holt, 2002.

THROUGH GEORGIA’S EYES by Rachel Victoria Rodriguez. Holt, 2006.

WHO PUT THE COOKIES IN THE COOKIE JAR by George Shannon. Holt, TBA.

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